Sticky Toffee Pudding

For all the recipes we Americans steal from the Europeans, the one that hasn’t stuck is a good Sticky Toffee Pudding. Why, I mean, what’s not to like? Date cake, good, toffee, good, Devonshire Cream, good, meat, good! When called upon to provide a fabulous dessert for a small catering job, a few things came to mind. The dessert needed to hold up after being out all afternoon in the elements without a way to reheat it. It also needed to be easy to serve and translate to a proper fall/winter dish. After giving it some thought, I was struck with the idea of doing a sticky toffee pudding.

I was watching one of those, “best things I ever ate” type shows a long while back and recalled a chef doing a sticky toffee pudding. They used three different methods for soaking sponge cake in that salty, buttery, sweet toffee sauce. It seemed like a grand idea, one that fit my needs perfectly.

The day before the gig, it was requested that I make the cake in a cast iron skillet to add some whimsy to the presentation. Although the recipes that I had researched to make one of my own only used baking dishes, I obliged because I thought that if I buttered the pan real good and then coated the pan with sugar, it would make a nice crisp edge for the moist dessert. It worked very well indeed I must say. It was pretty nerve-wracking to prepare this thing. It was like walking a tightrope without a net, or even an umbrella for that matter. To cook something you’ve never made before, and to have to do it perfectly the first and only time without reference is ridiculous. Through it all though, it turned out as the Brits say “Advantage-Agassi”.

Fans of clotted cream or Devonshire cream will appreciate this easy interpretation I made to the dollop on the side. Usually making the stuff is an all day process. But I’ve extracted the spirit of what a good cream is, while only taking 10 minutes of your time.

To complete this dessert properly might take a little time. However, the results are grand and it’s really not hard.  Just crank up some good Brit rock and go to town. Enjoy your bloody pudding mate.

Sticky Toffee Pudding

 Cake:

1 c pitted dates
1/3 c golden raisins
12 oz brewed hot tea
1 1/3 c butter
1 1/2 cups self rising flour. (To make self rising out of AP, sift in 2 tsp of baking powder and 1/2 tsp salt)
4 eggs
1 1/2 c sugar
1 tsp baking soda
2 tsp vanilla
 
Sauce:
 
12 oz heavy cream
2/3 c dark brown sugar
1/4 c butter
2 tbsp Karo syrup
pinch of salt
 
Cream:
 
1 cup cold heavy whipping cream
4 oz room temp cream cheese
1/8 cup sugar
dash of salt
 
 
Brew Tea
Pour over dates and raisins while tea is hot and let steep for at least 2 hours
Heat Oven to 325
Make toffee sauce by combining all ingredients in the sauce list into a medium saucepan on low temp until everything has melted. Then turn up heat to medium until the liquid begins to begins to bubble. Then let cool.
Grease and coat 10 inch cast iron skillet with sugar
Cream butter and sugar for about 3 minutes
Add eggs 1 at a time mixing well after each egg
Slowly add flour a little at a time, then set batter aside
Puree dates, raisins and tea in blender
Add baking soda and vanilla to dates and let sit 5 minutes, then fold gently into batter. Set aside.
Add half of batter to skillet, then add a quarter of toffee sauce on top. Add the remainder of batter, then place in oven for about 45 minutes or until the top has browned and a toothpick comes out clean from the middle.
Make “Devonshire”  by creaming room temp  cream cheese with sugar and salt. Whip heavy cream to stiff peaks and then fold cream cheese mixture very gently so as to not deflate cream.
After cake has cooled a bit, (15 minutes) poke holes all over with a knife and add a quarter more toffee sauce to let it all soak in.
When you’re ready to serve, pour more toffee sauce atop individual servings of the cake. and dollop cream on the side. Eat.

One thought on “Sticky Toffee Pudding

  1. Pingback: The Lakelander – A Picnic « Eat a Duck | Purveyors of delectable discourse

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